Dracula's Daughter: The Virgin Marya


$10.00

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    Dracula's Daughter (1936) is a tough nut to crack. It's a movie that feels hampered at times by Hollywood's standards and practices of the day, while also pushing boundaries in ways that are legitimately shocking. It's less a horror movie than a crime procedural, climaxing with a fedora-wearing, trenchcoat clad hero straight out of film noir storming Dracula's castle to rescue his love interest from a vampire. It also features a villain much more sympathetic than its predecessor, a woman trapped by obligation, circumstance and compulsion than the typical sadism seen in previous vampire features.

    The marketing for Dracula's Daughter also struggled with how to portray its villian. Most of the promotional images featured a green skinned, red eyed ghoul, a far cry from the soft-spoken lost soul depicted in the movie. Occasionally, though, Countess Marya Zaleska (played by Gloria Holden) was shown as some dark opposite to the Virgin Mary. I opted to play up that angle here, mostly because I admire the brazen sacrilidge, but also because my follow-up to Dracula needed to be in black and white. Still, I couldn't help throwing a little sepia into the mix.

    It's 11" x 17" on glossy paper.

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